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A.J. Adam Goldtröpfchen Riesling [GG]

Grape: Riesling
Region: Mosel
Vineyard: Goldtröpfchen
Soil: Grey Devonian Slate
Production: Spontaneous fermentation in stainless steel

Goldtröpfchen

Goldtröpfchen lies like a huge amphitheater in the outer loop of the Mosel, which flows around here Piesport. In its orientation, it stretches from southeast to south to southwest. The sunshine duration in the vineyards is long, east and west slope protect the opposite side from wind. With a slope of 30 to 70 percent, their vineyards are sometimes extremely steep. The easily warmed soil is comprised of deep, very weathered, dark Devon slate that contains quartz and minerals. In some places there is a high share of fine earth. The site generally has good available water capacity.

The name “Goldtröpfchen” means “gold droplet” and varies theories about its origin exist. It could possible come from the Celtic word for hill or mountain, “col”. Another hypothesis points to the glittery soil or golden drops of liquid that form on the ripe or botrytized grapes as a name source. Then again, even the value of the wine can be compared to gold. What is known for certain is that the Romans grew wine here in the year

Producer:
Vintage:
2017
Country:
Germany
Region:
Mosel
Appellation:
Mosel
Variety:
Riesling
Color:
White
Farming Practice:
Sustainable

Press & Reviews

Vinous Media

Score:
91
Review:
Lemon and cassis are tinged with cress and sage on a pungent nose and a palate whose bright citricity and invigorating herbal elements are assuaged by palpable lees-buffering and faint oiliness of texture. In keeping with the proclivities of Goldtröpfchen, this bottling harbors higher alcohol – at 12.5% – than do Adam’s two other vineyard-designated dry Rieslings, but there is by no means any sense of heaviness. Smoky, stony and piquant notes dominate on a pithy but tangy and satisfyingly juicy finish. I suspect that this needs a bit more time than its two immediate siblings but won’t necessarily have any greater aging potential. (This wine issues from the same old vines as did previous wines labeled for both Adam and Julian Haart. In 2017, Adam bought out Haart’s share in the joint project with this parcel, inaugurated in 2009.)