QLP-001

Dry Red Wine ‘Western Cape’, Leeu Passant

From one parcel of 36 year old dry farmed bush vine Cabernet Sauvignon planted in deep alluvial soils of Stellenbosch; one 115 year old dry farmed bush vine Cinsault vineyard (South Africa’s oldest registered Red Wine Vineyard) planted in deep sandy alluvial soils in Wellington; one parcel of 93 year old (SA’s 2nd oldest registered Red Wine Vineyard) dry farmed bush vine Cinsault planted on the lower eastern slopes of Franschhoek mountains; and a parcel of high altitude Cabernet Franc planted on the mid slopes of the Helderberg mountain in Stellenbosch. Grapes are cooled, whereafter they are crushed and destemmed into tank, and 25-50% whole clusters are added to the Cinsault and Cabernet Franc. Native fermentation takes place and the wine is pigeaged twice per day. The wines are racked and blended, aged in 30% new 225L French oak barrels for eighteen months, and then bottled. ABV 13.5%, pH 3.79. 418 cases produced.

Producer:
Vintage:
2015
Country:
South Africa
Region:
Western Cape
Appellation:
Franschhoek
Variety:
Blend - Other
Color:
Red
Case Pack:
6
Bottle Size:
750
UPC:
7-84585-02180-2

Press & Reviews

Parker

Score:
91
Date:
2017-04-28
Review:
The 2015 Leeu Passant Dry Red Wine is inspired by some of the classic South African wines from the 1950s and 1960s with tannins and freshness. It is predominantly Cabernet Sauvignon with Cinsault and a splash of Cabernet Franc. There are some stems in the vat and the wine matured in around 30% new oak. There is something traditional about the nose, in a positive sense, earthy red berry fruit, bell pepper and tobacco notes that feel quite intense. The palate is medium-bodied with grippy tannin, spicy in the mouth, drier than its peers and structured with plenty of black pepper lining the finish. It does hark back to the wines of old, albeit given a modern twist, more clean and less volatile. There is character here, a distinctive Cabernet-based red blend that will shine on the dinner table rather than on its own, and it deserves 4-5 years in bottle.
–Neal Martin, Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate