DE-KRF-22-17

Kruger-Rumpf [Dautenpflänzer] Im Langenberg Grosse Lage Riesling Feinherb

Kruger-Rumpf [Dautenpflänzer] Im Langenberg Grosse Lage Riesling Feinherb

Region Nahe
Grape:Riesling
Appellation: Nahe
Vineyard: Langenberg, which means Long hill.
Soil: quartzite and Devon slate covered with loam
Fermentation & Elevage Spontaneous fermentation in over 30 years old Stückfässern
Classification: VDP.GROSSE LAGE

Originally this wine was supposed to be a dry wine, however, the wine did not completely stop the alcoholic fermentation and thus it retained natural residual sweetness. Instead of drying it with pure yeast for bending and breaking, we filled the wine after a nine-month barrel maturation as it was.” Says Georg

Im Langenberg

Langenberg is located in the middle of the Kapellenberg vineyard slope between 120 and 180 metres. The six-hectare site faces south-southeast with a 20 – 40 % slope. The Grosse Lage borders the Dautenpflänzer to the east. The soil is quartzite and Devon slate covered with loam, which contributes to good water storage capacity. Langenberg is well protected from the wind due to its location in a side valley of the Nahe below the Münster forest.

Producer:
Vintage:
2017
Country:
Germany
Region:
Nahe
Appellation:
Nahe
Variety:
Riesling
Color:
White

Press & Reviews

Wine Advocate

Score:
93
Date:
2019-10-19

James Suckling

Score:
93
Date:
2018-09-26
Review:
This is a stunning, harmonious dry riesling that is sleek and intense, juicy and serious with a racy and complex finish. Drink or hold.

Vinous Media

Score:
93
Date:
2019-04-18
Review:
“This is what was once our Dautenpflänzer Spätlese halbtrocken, but with a new name,” says Georg Rumpf. The significance of “Im Langenberg” – besides its being, naturally, the cadaster name for where the wine grew – is that the estate wants to promote this wine, alongside its Grosse Gewächse, as a “VDP-Grosse Lage” bottling, but the VDP wouldn’t countenance two-such wines labeled merely for “Dautenpflänzer.” The inspiration for this bottling’s “hidden sweetness” (resulting from residual sugar only a little bit in excess of legal Trockenheit) is the same as that for the last three vintages of Münsterer Im Pitterberg Kabinett, namely Stefan Rumpf’s desire to see this style revived. “And I think it fits 2017 especially well,” notes son Georg. He can say that again! Wreathed in honeysuckle perfume, mirabelle, papaya and grapefruit waft from the glass, then burst onto the polished palate with infectious juiciness. What a striking comparison this makes with the corresponding Grosses Gewächs: A small difference in residual calls forth what I think of as Dautenpflänzer’s site-typical fruitiness and florality. Not that there is any lack of spicy or mineral impingements here; on the contrary, caraway, Ceylon tea, crushed stone and salt serve for intrigue and saliva-inducement in a multi-layered, buoyantly-sustained finish. Incidentally, at 12.3% alcohol this bottling is nearly a full percentage point lighter than its Grosses Gewächs counterparts, a difference accounted for by the fact that the latter is quite radically dry.

REVIEWS FROM PAST VINTAGES